REFLECTIONS IN THE MIRROR OF CHANGE

REFLECTIONS IN THE MIRROR OF CHANGE

For many of us, when we look in the mirror at our reflection, we initially see ourselves as the person we wish to be.  But if you wait long enough, your true image starts to become clearer, much like a digital photo calibrating.

The culture of ‘selfies’ can mask the reality of our lives to the viewer and possibly to ourselves.  It is a photo portraying how you want to be perceived by the public, but is it really you?  Photos are a snapshot in time that can hide the challenges and frustrations that surround us in our daily lives.

Suffering the loss of a close family member, friend, marriage, job or trauma can cause many significant impacts on our daily lives.  When faced with adversity, our potential to function to our maximum ability is determined by our levels of resiliency.

Our capacity to recover is dependent on a number of circumstances, some within our reach whilst others are out of our reach.  The complexity of these circumstances affect our recovery which results in how quickly we adjust to change or how quickly we deteriorate.  Recovery from depression or discouragement is largely influenced by the flexibility of our own resilience.

Change is a major factor in both our personal and professional lives.  With each subsequent change, people can continue to struggle, entering a downhill spiral of cognitive functioning including reduced problem solving, effectiveness and diminished decision making.  Accordingly, a person’s outlook is weakened which causes a further slide in thinking and their ability to remain positive, dwindles.

The WHAT Goals? theory was developed by Tracy Tully for her Motivation and Resilience for Women online programme in 2012, with the intent to help individuals make appropriate choices and learn improved problem-solving and decision-making skills.  WHAT Goals? is a model that helps people reduce their anxiety around managing information by providing them with a clear plan for monitoring their self-progress.  The language is simple, necessary to be called to mind quickly when needed.  

WHAT Goals?

W – what do you want to change

H – how will you do it

A – achieve with small steps

T – time it will take

The model can be used in simple activities or for those that are much more complex.  The following is a simple example for a person who wishes to lose 5 kilograms through healthy eating, regular exercise and by recording and analysing their data regularly using the aid of a Fitbit.  

You would apply the model as I’ve done in the following example, making sure that you keep it short, simple and achievable for your best success.

WHAT Goals – Individual Plan for Name: ………………………………………………

WHAT:

1. Lose 5 kg from my current weight being: ……………………………………

2. Commencing on Date: ………………………………………………………………..

3. Finishing on Date: ……………………………………………………………………….

HOW:  

1. purchase Fitbit Alta

2. download the Fitbit app and the MyFitnessPal app to mobile and/or computer

3. purchase the book What the FAT? Authors – Grant Schofield, Dr Caryn Zinn & Craig Rodger (Echo in association with Blackwell & Ruth

4. Read the book taking notes to help you understand the best meals from Pages 92 onwards

5. Using the recommendations from the book develop a Four Week Meal Plan

ACHIEVE:

1. Display 4 Week Meal Plan in your bedroom, office and kitchen with the relevant Start and End dates

2. use apps daily to record and monitor your nutrition and fitness levels

TIME:

 This will take me 4 weeks to achieve

REWARD:   Example:  Buy tickets for my family to go to ………………………….. Concert

When a simple model such as the WHAT? GOALS is broken down into a short and succinct plan, cognitive functioning including reduced problem solving, effectiveness and diminished decision making, is improved.  

When a goal is achieved, the cognitive behaviour is in turn rewarded.  The spiral then progresses upwards into a positive one as you can face greater challenges by applying this model.

Tracy xxx

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